Off the Wall and on the Floor

January, 2011 -- The RRP Rule impacts surfaces other than walls and ceiling.  Carpet and flooring installers are also impacted in their business. 

If you are replacing or installing carpet or flooring, these are key statistics you can use to determine if your job falls within the RRP criteria:

  • Disruption 6 square feet or more of lead-painted surface per room within a 30 day period (non-HUD housing).
  • Disruption of 2-square feet or more (HUD housing)
  • In regards to baseboards and shoe moldings, disruption of 32 linear feet of 2¼” baseboard (non-HUD)

It would be recommended if you are working on a pre-1978 building that you first consider the likelihood that you will disrupt more than 6 square feet of surface area.  If you will be disrupting this area of space, or more, then you would be smart to include the cost for lead paint testing in the job quote.  

Here are some tips from Bona.com:

IF LEAD IS PRESENT IN BASEBOARDS and/or shoe moldings, determine if it is possible to perform the renovation or repair without disturbing the lead-painted surfaces. It may be possible to hand-sand the edges and avoid removing or disturbing the baseboards and/or shoe moldings. If this is not possible, follow renovation and repair procedures from your EPA-accredited lead-safe work practices training program.

IF LEAD IS PRESENT IN BASEBOARDS AND/OR SHOE MOLDINGS, AND CARPET IS BEING REMOVED, determine if it is possible to remove the carpet without disturbing the lead-painted surfaces.

If possible, install the new wood flooring 1/8” – 1/4” from the baseboards without removing or disturbing it.

This expansion space plus the space included under the existing baseboard should provide the required ¾” expansion space as recommended in the NWFA Installation Guidelines. Then install new shoe molding to cover the combined expansion space. If this is not possible, follow renovation and repair procedures from your EPA-accredited lead-safe work practices training program.

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