DESIGN

DESIGN
Tips on 'Breaking Out of the Box'
Baltimore, MD -







  • Lighting. "Lighting becomes a crucial element. You want to think about what it looks like at night, how it spreads across cabinetry. Think about general and task lighting, and the types of light bulbs, " says Block.
  • Varying cabinetry heights. "The way cabinetry is installed depends on the space, whether you have stock or custom, and what look you're trying to achieve. A lot can be done with cabinetry," Block notes.
  • Appliance location. "Don't just put them in standard spots. Make use of them. Think about how your customers will use them," says Block.
  • Islands. "Think about shapes and different heights," advises Block.
  • Accents. Use things like glass, tambour, mirrors and tiles to give the space visual impact, says Block. "Expand your visual boundaries."

MANAGEMENT
1998 Performance Benchmarks Reveal Keys to Higher Profits
Hackettstown, NJ





















  • While custom cabinets still represent the majority of sales for most kitchen and bath dealers, semi-custom appears to be gaining, particularly in the Midwest and among those dealers with smaller annual sales (less than $500,000).
  • These same dealers also feature moderately-sized showrooms, between 1,001 and 2,000 sq. ft. in size.
  • Dealers who sell predominantly custom and semi-custom cabinetry are much more likely to charge a design fee than dealers who sell predominately stock cabinetry.
  • Those selling mostly custom command the highest design fees - an average $957 compared to $7111 for semi-custom firms and $590 for stock firms. Dealers in the Northeast receive the highest design fees (an average of $1,084); the Midwest and the West receive an average of $809 and $816, respectively, while the South trails other regions considerably with an average of $634.
  • With the Year 2000 fast approaching, nearly all dealers use computers for word processing. Interestingly, high-profit firms are less likely than other firms to use computers for design or estimating, although an additional 17% of these businesses planned
    to start using the computers for estimating.
  • When it comes to financial management, high-profit firms are apparently somewhat more inclined than others to use computers, the study suggests.
    In addition, more firms are planning to use on-line services and CD-ROM product catalogs. About 38% of all reporting dealers said they used on-line services in 1997 - up from about 23% from the previous PAR study report. An additional 20% reported that they planned to get on-line in 1998.

Editor's Note: Kitchen & Bath Design News.

SALES
Remodeler: Building a Referral Base Builds Your Business
Baltimore, MD












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