Believe in design/build

Since 2005, I’ve worked with Residential Design + Build magazine in some capacity — first as assistant editor, now as editor. In the time since I started with the magazine six years ago, I’ve learned a lot about the design/build industry and have developed my own passion for it. The concept of design/build just makes sense. I’ve had many arguments over the years with people who don’t understand its value. But I still don’t understand how anyone could argue against clear, open lines of communication between every single person involved in creating a custom home.

Throughout these six years, I’ve also had the opportunity to read the columns written by those even more passionate about design/build — Joseph Dellanno, Jay Grant and Luis Jauregui, AIA — as well as every designer and builder I’ve interviewed for a story. While I was working on preparing this issue for the graphic designer, I noticed both Jauregui (page 8) and Dellanno (page 14) wrote similar-themed columns about their passion for design/build. Neither one was directed to specifically write about design/build for this issue, yet they both did.

 

In their columns, both men discuss the building and design industry’s lack of acceptance for this way of constructing a single-family home. Jauregui writes: “It turns out, I didn’t fit the norm. As a hybrid, I was odd man out.” And yet, he continued to believe this was the best way to custom home construction. Today, Jauregui is actively involved in the Custom Residential Architects Network within the American Institute of Architects and the Custom Home Builders Committee within the National Association of Home Builders.

Yes, design/build is a different way to do business, but different doesn’t always mean bad, and people like Jauregui and others profiled in this publication are proof of this. Dellanno says it best in his column: “Design/build used to be two lonely words stuck together. The people who put them together were fed up with the status quo and made a stand.”

As 2011 comes to an end, we close another year where more people understood the value of design/build because people like you are out there dedicated to this business model. As we move into 2012, I encourage you to continue the fight for design/build, working together, and removing the egos. Like Dellanno writes in his column, “ … design/build is an amazing industry producing amazing results. I look forward to watching it grow, develop and evolve into the next generation.”

I, too, look forward to its growth and successes.

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